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27 federal grants to Ohio for substance abuse

27 Ohio communities, many of them rural, receive grands from Drug Free Communities program. Here’s the raw release. I tried to highlight community names.

New Grantees in the State of Ohio

Coalition Name: Coalition for a Healthy Middletown
Grant Award: SP080350 – 06
Grant Recipient Organization: Safety Council of Southwestern Ohio
Coalition Community: Middletown, OH
Grant Recipient Contact Name: Kristy Duritsch
Grant Recipient Contact Mailing Address: 1050 Central Avenue, Middletown, OH 45044
Grant Recipient Contact E-Mail Address: Kristy@safetycouncilswohio.org
Grant Recipient Contact Phone Number: 513-423-9758
Grant Recipient Congressional District: OH-1
Coalition Contact Name: Kristy Duritsch
Coalition Contact Mailing Address: 1050 Central Avenue, Middletown, OH 45044
Coalition Contact E-Mail Address: Kristy@safetycouncilswohio.org
Coalition Contact Phone Number: 513-423-9758
Ohio
Serving Federal Congressional District(s): OH-1; OH-8
Coalition Located in Federal Congressional District: OH-1

Program Description
The Coalition for a Healthy Middletown was awarded a $125,000 Drug Free Communities
(DFC) Support Program FY 2017 grant by the White House Office of National Drug Control
Policy (ONDCP) and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
(SAMHSA). The coalition serves Middletown, OH, a community of 48,694. The goal of the
coalition is to establish and strengthen community collaboration in support of local efforts to
prevent youth substance use. The coalition will achieve its goal by implementing these
strategies:

  1. Decreasing alcohol usage.
  2. Increasing peer disapproval of underage alcohol use.
  3. Decreasing 30 day use of youth marijuana usage.
  4. Increase perception of harm in youth alcohol usage.

Coalition Name: The Cincinnati for HOPE Coalition
Grant Award: SP080159 – 01
Grant Recipient Organization: Exclusive Services
Coalition Community: Cincinnati, OH
Grant Recipient Contact Name: Tracy Rawls
Grant Recipient Contact Mailing Address: 11134 Luschek Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45241
Grant Recipient Contact E-Mail Address: trawls@xservices.org
Grant Recipient Contact Phone Number: 513-370-9925
Grant Recipient Congressional District: OH-2
Coalition Contact Name: Dr. Dionne Hollis
Coalition Contact Mailing Address: 11134 Luschek Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45241
Coalition Contact E-Mail Address: treatment@xservices.org
Coalition Contact Phone Number: 513-827-9273
Serving Federal Congressional District(s): OH-1; OH-2
Coalition Located in Federal Congressional District: OH-1

Project Description
The Cincinnati for HOPE Coalition was awarded a FY 2017 Drug-Free Communities (DFC)
Support Program grant in the amount of $125,000 by the White House Office of National Drug
Control Policy (ONDCP), in cooperation with the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services
Administration (SAMHSA). The coalition serves the city of Cincinnati, OH, a community of
296,550. The goal of the coalition is to establish and strengthen community collaboration in
support of local efforts to prevent youth substance use. The coalition will achieve its goal by
implementing these strategies:

  1. Enhancing/access/reducing barriers.
  2. Modifying/changing policies.
  3. Changing consequences.

Coalition Name: Scioto County Drug Action Team Alliance
Grant Award: SP018684 – 06
Grant Recipient Organization: Portsmouth City Health Department
Coalition Community: Scioto County, OH
Grant Recipient Contact Name: Christopher Smith
Grant Recipient Contact Mailing Address: 605 Washington Street, Portsmouth, OH 45662
Grant Recipient Contact E-Mail Address: Chris.Smith@portsmouthoh.org
Grant Recipient Contact Phone Number: 740-353-5153
Grant Recipient Congressional District: OH-2
Coalition Contact Name: Lisa Roberts, RN
Coalition Contact Mailing Address: 605 Washington Street, Portsmouth, OH 45662
Coalition Contact E-Mail Address: Lisa.Roberts@portsmouthoh.org
Coalition Contact Phone Number: 740-354-8943
Serving Federal Congressional District(s): OH-2, OH-6
Coalition Located in Federal Congressional District: OH-2

Project Description
The Scioto County Drug Action Team Alliance was awarded a FY 2017 Drug-Free Communities
(DFC) Support Program grant in the amount of $125,000 by the White House Office of National
Drug Control Policy (ONDCP), in cooperation with the Substance Abuse and Mental Health
Services Administration (SAMHSA). The coalition serves Scioto County, OH, a community
with a population of 76,825. The goal of the coalition is to establish and strengthen community
collaboration in support of local efforts to prevent youth substance use. The coalition will
achieve its goal by implementing these strategies:

  1. Building community capacity and engage coalition members in coordinating, planning
    and evaluating a comprehensive population-based initiative to achieve a quantifiable
    reduction in youth substance use.
  2. Creating strategies designed to change community conditions and social norms around
    youth substance use.
  3. Creating youth substance abuse prevention and education activities.
  4. Establishing data driven decision making through youth surveys that obtain core data for
    the purpose of baseline establishment, programmatic implementation, and evaluation.

Coalition Name: Faith in Recovery Prevention Coalition
Grant Award: SP080019 – 01
Grant Recipient Organization: Community Action Commission of Fayette County
Coalition Community: Fayette County, OH
Grant Recipient Contact Name: Lucinda Baughn
Grant Recipient Contact Mailing Address: 1400 U.S. Route 22 NW, Washington C.H., OH
43160
Grant Recipient Contact E-Mail Address: bbaughn@cacfayettecounty.org
Grant Recipient Contact Phone Number: 740-335-7282
Grant Recipient Congressional District: OH-10
Coalition Contact Name: Judy Havens
Coalition Contact Mailing Address: 1400 U.S. Route 22 NW, Washington C.H., OH 43160
Coalition Contact E-Mail Address: jhavens@cacfayettecounty.org
Coalition Contact Phone Number: 740-335-7282
Serving Federal Congressional District(s): OH-10, OH-15
Coalition Located in Federal Congressional District: OH-10

Project Description
The Faith in Recovery Prevention Coalition was awarded a FY 2017 Drug-Free Communities
(DFC) Support Program grant in the amount of $125,000 by the White House Office of National
Drug Control Policy (ONDCP), in cooperation with the Substance Abuse and Mental Health
Services Administration (SAMHSA). The coalition serves Fayette County, OH, a community of
28,679. The goal of the coalition is to establish and strengthen community collaboration in
support of local efforts to prevent youth substance use. The coalition will achieve its goal by
implementing these strategies:

  1. Providing evidence-based prevention programs in the local schools.
  2. Providing PAX Good Behavior Games to Head Start and interested elementary school teachers.
  3. Establishing and assisting youth-led prevention efforts in the middle and high schools.
  4. Conducting evidence based media and social media campaigns.
  5. Conducting workshops for parents on how to talk to their kids about substance use.
  6. Developing an inventory of alternative activities for youth in our community.

Coalition Name: Coalition for Health Promotion
Grant Award: SP080140 – 01
Grant Recipient Organization: Youngstown UMADAOP
Coalition Community: East Side of Youngstown, OH
Grant Recipient Contact Name: Darryl Alexander Sr.
Grant Recipient Contact Mailing Address: 1327 Florencedale Avenue, Youngstown, OH 44505
Grant Recipient Contact E-Mail Address: alexandersrdarryl@yahoo.com
Grant Recipient Contact Phone Number: 330-743-2772
Grant Recipient Congressional District: OH-13th
Coalition Contact Name: Brenda Heidinger
Coalition Contact Mailing Address: 222 West Federal Plaza, Suite 201, Youngstown, OH 44503
Coalition Contact E-Mail Address: bheidinger@mahoningcountyoh.gov
Coalition Contact Phone Number: 330-746-2959
Serving Federal Congressional District(s): OH-13th
Coalition Located in Federal Congressional District: OH-13th

Project Description
The Coalition for Health Promotion (CFHP) was awarded a FY 2017 Drug-Free Communities
(DFC) Support Program grant in the amount of $125,000 by the White House Office of National
Drug Control Policy (ONDCP), in cooperation with the Substance Abuse and Mental Health
Services Administration (SAMHSA). The coalition serves Youngstown, OH, a community of
65,573. The goal of the coalition is to establish and strengthen community collaboration in
support of local efforts to prevent youth substance use. The coalition will achieve its goal by
implementing these strategies:
1. Changing social norms.
2. Reducing access.
3. Policy change.
4. Creative media strategies.

DFC Continuation Grantees in the 2nd Congressional District of Ohio

Application Number: 5 SP020821-03
Grantee Name: CLERMONT RECOVERY CENTER. INC.
Grantee Congressional District: 02
Coalition Name: Coalition for a Drug-Free Clermont County
Coalition Coordinator: Mary Wolff
Coalition Address: 1088 Wasserman Way
Coalition City: Batavia
Coalition State and Zip: OH 45103
Coalition Phone: 513-735-8143
Coalition Congressional District(s) Served: 02
Grant Amount: 125000

Application Number: 5 SP017077-08
Grantee Name: MILFORD EXEMPTED VILLAGE SCHOOL DISTRICT
Grantee Congressional District: 02
Coalition Name: PARTNERS FOR A DRUG FREE MILFORD MIAMI TOWNSHIP
Coalition Coordinator: Ted Haskins
Coalition Address: 1 Eagles Way
Coalition City: Milford
Coalition State and Zip: OH 45150
Coalition Phone: 513-576-2267
Coalition Congressional District(s) Served: 02
Grant Amount: 125000

Application Number: 5 SP021511-02
Grantee Name: MADISONVILLE WEED AND SEED SUSTAINED
Grantee Congressional District: 02
Coalition Name: Madisonville Weed and Seed Coalition
Coalition Coordinator: Kathleen Garrison
Coalition Address: 4917 Whetsel Avenue
Coalition City: Cincinnati
Coalition State and Zip: OH 45227
Coalition Phone: 513-460-5060
Coalition Congressional District(s) Served: 02
Grant Amount: 125000

DFC Continuation Grantees in the 4th Congressional District of Ohio

Application Number: 5 SP021391-04
Grantee Name: MENTAL HLTH & RECOVERY BRD OF UNION CNTY
Grantee Congressional District: 04
Coalition Name: Union County Drug Free Coalition
Coalition Coordinator: Holly Zweizig
Coalition Address: 131 N. Main Street, Suite A
Coalition City: Marysville
Coalition State and Zip: OH 43040
Coalition Phone: 937-642-1212
Coalition Congressional District(s) Served: 04
Grant Amount: 125000

DFC Continuation Grantees in the 5th Congressional District of Ohio

Application Number: 5 SP020309-04
Grantee Name: WOOD COUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATION
Grantee Congressional District: 05
Coalition Name: Wood County
Prevention Coalition
Coalition Coordinator: Kyle Clark
Coalition Address: 1867 N. Research Dr.
Coalition City: Bowling Green
Coalition State and Zip: OH 43402
Coalition Phone: 419-806-9408
Coalition Congressional District(s) Served: 05
Grant Amount: 125000

Application Number: 5 SP020888-08
Grantee Name: SWANTON AREA COMMUNITY COALITION
Grantee Congressional District: 05
Coalition Name: SWANTON AREA COMMUNITY COALITION, INC.
Coalition Coordinator: Adorn Grabarczyk
Coalition Address: 97 North Main Street
Coalition City: Swanton
Coalition State and Zip: OH 43558
Coalition Phone: 419-826-1222
Coalition Congressional District(s) Served: 05; 09
Grant Amount: 125000

Application Number: 5 SP015851-09
Grantee Name: FULTON COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT
Grantee Congressional District: 05
Coalition Name: Partnership for a Drug-Free Fulton County
Coalition Coordinator: Beth Thomas
Coalition Address: 606 South Shoop Avenue
Coalition City: Wauseon
Coalition State and Zip: OH 43567
Coalition Phone: 419-337-0915
Coalition Congressional District(s) Served: 05
Grant Amount: 125000

Application Number: 5 SP017030-08
Grantee Name: YMCA OF GREATER TOLEDO
Grantee Congressional District: 05
Coalition Name: AWAKE to a Safe and Healthy Community
Coalition Coordinator: Amy Barrett
Coalition Address: 1200 Michigan Ave.
Coalition City: Waterville
Coalition State and Zip: OH 43566
Coalition Phone: 419-441-0029
Coalition Congressional District(s) Served: 05
Grant Amount: 125000

DFC Continuation Grantees in the 6th Congressional District of Ohio

Application Number: 5 SP017138-08
Grantee Name: FAMILY RECOVERY CENTER
Grantee Congressional District: 06
Coalition Name: Alcohol Drug Abuse Prevention Team Coalition
Coalition Coordinator: Brenda Foor
Coalition Address: 966 North Market Street LL, P.O. Box 464
Coalition City: Lisbon
Coalition State and Zip: OH 44432
Coalition Phone: 330-424-0531
Coalition Congressional District(s) Served: 06
Grant Amount: 125000

DFC Continuation Grantees in the 7th Congressional District of Ohio

Application Number: 5 SP020744-03
Grantee Name: COUNTY OF KNOX
Grantee Congressional District: 07
Coalition Name: Knox Substance Abuse Action Team
Coalition Coordinator: Julie Miller
Coalition Address: 11660 Upper Gilchrist Road
Coalition City: Mount Vernon
Coalition State and Zip: OH 43050
Coalition Phone: 740-392-2200
Coalition Congressional District(s) Served: 07
Grant Amount: 125000

Application Number: 5 SP020413-09
Grantee Name: MENTAL HEALTH/ REC SRVS BOARD/STARK CNTY
Grantee Congressional District: 07
Coalition Name: Stark County Anti-Drug Coalition
Coalition Coordinator: Frances Gerbig
Coalition Address: 800 Market Avenue North, Suite 400
Coalition City: Canton
Coalition State and Zip: OH 44702
Coalition Phone: 330-455-6644
Coalition Congressional District(s) Served: 07; 13; 16
Grant Amount: 125000

DFC Continuation Grantees in the 8th Congressional District of Ohio

Application Number: 5 SP022153-09
Grantee Name: BUTLER COUNTY EDUCATIONAL SERVICE CENTER
Grantee Congressional District: 08
Coalition Name: The Butler County Coalition
Coalition Coordinator: Lauren Marsh
Coalition Address: 6 South Second Street, Suite 420
Coalition City: Hamilton
Coalition State and Zip: OH 45011
Coalition Phone: 513-896-2335
Coalition Congressional District(s) Served: 08
Grant Amount: 125000

Application Number: 5 SP019823-05
Grantee Name: ALCOHOLISM COUNCIL/BUTLER COUNTY, OH,INC
Grantee Congressional District: 08
Coalition Name: Greater Hamilton Coalition
Coalition Coordinator: Christi Valentini
Coalition Address: 2935 Hamilton Mason Road
Coalition City: Hamilton
Coalition State and Zip: OH 45011
Coalition Phone: 513-868-2100
Coalition Congressional District(s) Served: 08
Grant Amount: 125000

Application Number: 5 SP020927-08
Grantee Name: FAIRFIELD CITY SCHOOL DISTRICT
Grantee Congressional District: 08
Coalition Name: COALITION FOR A SAFE AND DRUG-FREE FAIRFIELD
Coalition Coordinator: Pat Van Oflen
Coalition Address: 3249 Greenwich Drive
Coalition City: Fairfield
Coalition State and Zip: OH 45014-
Coalition Phone: 513-829-3565
Coalition Congressional District(s) Served: 08
Grant Amount: 125000

DFC Continuation Grantees in the 9th Congressional District of Ohio

Application Number: 5 SP014693-10
Grantee Name: ALCOHOL & DRUG ADD SRVS BD OF LORAIN CTY
Grantee Congressional District: 09
Coalition Name: THE LORAIN COUNTY COMMUNITIES THAT CARE PARTNERSHIP
Coalition Coordinator: Timonthy Williams
Coalition Address: 4950 Oberlin Avenue
Coalition City: Lorain
Coalition State and Zip: OH 44053-
Coalition Phone: 440-366-1106
Coalition Congressional District(s) Served: 09; 13
Grant Amount: 46050

Application Number: 5 SP020391-04
Grantee Name: ERIE COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT
Grantee Congressional District: 09
Coalition Name: Partners for Prevention of Erie County
Coalition Coordinator: Devin Pollick
Coalition Address: 420 Superior Street
Coalition City: Sandusky
Coalition State and Zip: OH 08754-
Coalition Phone: 419-626-5623
Coalition Congressional District(s) Served: 09
Grant Amount: 125000

DFC Continuation Grantees in the 12th Congressional District of Ohio

Application Number: 5 SP015726-09
Grantee Name: RECOVERY & PREVENTION RES/DE/MORROW CNTY
Grantee Congressional District: 12
Coalition Name: Drug Free Delaware Coalition
Coalition Coordinator: Julie Krupp
Coalition Address: 118 Stover Drive
Coalition City: Delaware
Coalition State and Zip: OH 43015-
Coalition Phone: 740-369-6811
Coalition Congressional District(s) Served: 12
Grant Amount: 125000

DFC Continuation Grantees in the 13th Congressional District of Ohio

Application Number: 5 SP021050-03
Grantee Name: COALITION FOR A DRUG-FREE MAHONING CNTY
Grantee Congressional District: 13
Coalition Name: Coalition for a Drug Free Mahoning County
Coalition Coordinator: Angela McClellan
Coalition Address: 25 East Boardman Street
Coalition City: Youngstown
Coalition State and Zip: OH 44503-
Coalition Phone: 330-771-7732
Coalition Congressional District(s) Served: 06; 13
Grant Amount: 125000

DFC Continuation Grantees in the 14th Congressional District of Ohio

Application Number: 5 SP020528-04
Grantee Name: ASHTABULA CO. MN & RECOV. SERVS BOARD
Grantee Congressional District: 14
Coalition Name: Ashtabula County Prevention Coalition
Coalition Coordinator: Kaiti Park
Coalition Address: 4817 State Road, Suite 203
Coalition City: Ashtabula
Coalition State and Zip: OH 44004-
Coalition Phone: 440-992-3121
Coalition Congressional District(s) Served: 14
Grant Amount: 82900

Application Number: 5 SP021646-07
Grantee Name: COMMUNITY AWARENESS AND PREVENTION ASSOC
Grantee Congressional District: 14
Coalition Name: Community Awareness and Prevention Association
Coalition Coordinator: Kelly Lazar
Coalition Address: 6380 Mill Road
Coalition City: Broadview Hts.
Coalition State and Zip: OH 44147-
Coalition Phone: 440-740-4751
Coalition Congressional District(s) Served: 14
Grant Amount: 125000

DFC Continuation Grantees in the 16th Congressional District of Ohio

Application Number: 5 SP019983-05
Grantee Name: NORTH ROYALTON CITY SCHOOL DISTRICT
Grantee Congressional District: 16
Coalition Name: Partnership for A Healthy North Royalton
Coalition Coordinator: Kristin Brooks
Coalition Address: 14713 Ridge Road
Coalition City: North Royalton
Coalition State and Zip: OH 44133-
Coalition Phone: 440-582-7834
Coalition Congressional District(s) Served: 13; 16
Grant Amount: 125000

Application Number: 5 SP020543-04
Grantee Name: LIBERTY CENTER CONNECTIONS, INC.
Grantee Congressional District: 16
Coalition Name: Turning Point Coalition
Coalition Coordinator: Eileen Keller
Coalition Address: 104 Spink St.
Coalition City: Wooster
Coalition State and Zip: OH 44691-
Coalition Phone: 330-264-8498
Coalition Congressional District(s) Served: 16
Grant Amount: 125000

huffpost-listening-tour-990x495

A weeks-long tour by journalists using new interview techniques…

Acknowledging the need to listen better to America’s diverse voices, the Huffington Post is taking 40 staffers on a tour of the United States that will visit about 25 communities — including stops in Ohio, West Virginia and western Pennsylvania — and experimenting with new interview techniques.

They’re also partnering with local news outlets on stories.

Hillary Frey, HuffPo’s head of strategy, explained the project as an effort “to connect the largely New York- and D.C.-based news organization to non-coastal America,” Nieman Lab reported in an interview.

When we started talking about doing this tour — and I had some experience doing more questionnaire-based projects — we really wanted to create an environment where people feel comfortable getting personal with us. The goal of…training is to give our staff skills in active listening and to learn how to approach conversations with prompts rather than hard questions.

And this…

We want some expertise in how you guide a conversation to help people open up about what matters to them, and what issues they want to talk about. We really want to make sure we’re listening, and we’re asking questions that allow us to listen and respond and get people to go deeper, rather than go through set questions one through five.

This is an experiment worth watching.

dem-fund-pathways-to-engagement

Mainstream media in Ohio — what should they do with and for the public?

Engagement ideas applicable to Ohio news outlets

Journalists are exploring new ways to better represent people in their communities. Below are some Ohio and national examples. Anyone have suggestions for topics? Have questions for the news outlets in your community? Ask and we’ll forward to the news organization.

Next week, a Mansfield news startup will hold a party to battle infant mortality

The Richland Source is receiving support from the Solutions Journalism Network for an educational event on healthy babies – a community-wide baby shower. SoJo encourages media to find  proven best practices and present them to the community,  and cover the citizens as they put those practices into their lives.

Equipping inmates to do journalism (No, this is not a newsroom joke)

The folks at WYSO, an NPR affiliate in Yellow Springs, produced a powerful series of audio reports on women in prison by training the women to interview each other. Inmates had a bond that allowed them to ask powerful questions and receive honest answers. As station manager Neenah Ellis said, this was a lot of work; not something you do on a whim.

If you have only a few minutes, listen to this one about a high school athlete who became hooked on opioids after a sports injury, or this high school teacher, who will never stand in a classroom again.

Better: Listen to the entire project. About 59 minutes.

Examples of community engagement projects for your local news outlet, from the Democracy Fund:

  • What’s With Washington? WAMU crowdsources questions specific to the Washington, D.C. metro area for investigation. Listeners and readers vote on questions and can join reporters to work on the story.
  • Dirty Little Secrets. The Center for Investigative Reporting (CIR) is leading this large-scale collaborative investigative reporting project in New Jersey focused on “the local impacts of New Jersey’s toxic legacy.” Contributors include New Jersey Public Radio/ WNYC, WHYY, NJTV, NJ Spotlight, Jersey Shore Hurricane News, WBGO, New Brunswick Today, and the Rutgers Department of Journalism and Media Studies. WFMU additionally commissioned comedians to create stand-up routines sourced from the stories about contamination. They performed in a Toxic Comedy tour that included discussions with reporters.
  • Here’s the complete report and list of ideas.

Kudos to the Your Voice Ohio engagement leaders at the Jefferson Center.

ABC News Australia reported on citizens juries and their role in redefining one of the most controversial and explosive topics people can discuss: Health care. The Jefferson Center is among the first to experiment with carefully selected, representative bodies of citizens to deliberate on a topic and arrive at workable solutions. Jefferson Center secured our funding last year and this year. Program Director Andrew Rockway is designing the heroin conversations that will occur in the Mahoning Valley.

F*ck Heroin

Ohio heroin news update

I saw this car in a McDonald’s parking lot near Middletown south of Dayton, in the heart of the nation’s heroin trade.

Hurricane Harvey vs Heroin

Five are known dead more than two days after Hurricane/Tropical Storm Harvey made landfall. Meanwhile, more than six Ohioans likely died of heroin overdoses in that time, and tens of thousands more are using or affected by abuse.

Needle exchanges — a solution story worth pursuing in Ohio counties

Exchanges have significant statistical support as a solution to heroin-related dangers and significant public costs. These counties with large numbers of ODs don’t appear to have them: Montgomery, Lucas, Mahoning, Trumbull, Jefferson, Lorain, Lake, Clark, and these more rural counties with high death rates: Jackson, Pike, Clinton, Brown, Adams, Marion, Vinton and Allen.

This unofficial list of needle-exchange locations was provided by Melanie Amato at the Ohio Department of Health. Ohio Syringe Exchange Programs as of 6-17-17 (1) Exchanges are not required to report to the state.

Amato also provided this link to the Ohio Revised Code regarding exchanges.

Meanwhile, Amato says complete, final 2016 data is not yet available. Your Voice Ohio will receive the information as soon as possible.

Recent stories

National Graphic produced a somewhat complicated but fascinating animated video showing how drugs affect brain processes. Worth linking to stories.

CNN says southwest Ohio is the nation’s epicenter: Clermont County sheriff’s personal experience leads CNN report . Story says the nation’s supply passes through Dayton via interstates 70 and 75.

The Dispatch published a three-day series last week on the impact of fentanyl. A recent trend is that the deaths are getting younger. (We’ll explore this down to the county level when new data arrives.)

Deaths may be understated, according to a University Virginia sampling, in this NBC News. According to the researcher who studied Pennsylvania and several other states (not Ohio), “a specific drug was not identified in 19.5 percent of fatal overdoses. And in 2008, that figure was even higher — 25.4.” So I checked Ohio for 2014-15: About 20 percent of the death certificates said died of an unspecified drug.

Solutions

Because data show younger people becoming addicted and dying, education becomes critical. What are your local school districts doing? Need data on young deaths for your county? I can provide them. Here’s a U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration data sheet that includes education programs.

flames

People have heroin solutions that we haven’t considered

While engaging with people regarding the heroin crisis, public officials and journalists are encountering unique solutions.

In Ross County south of Columbus, irritated with renters using drugs in his mobile homes, the owner set one of the units on fire. We don’t have a database suggesting that this practice is a long-term solution, though it would be curious to hear the owner’s experiences that led him to be so exasperated.

For proven solutions, check out this Your Voice Ohio blog for several at work in Ohio, among them needle exchanges, Quick Response Teams and data analysis.

Dylann Roof profile: A writing style for the future, and warning to Ohioans

Long-form writer Rachel Kaadzi Ghansah profiled racist killer Dylann Roof for GQ with some of the finest research and writing I have ever seen.

As the Your Voice Ohio project encourages transparency in our work — explaining our reasons,  perspectives and processes — Ghansah does so with brilliance.

In what ought to be an alarm to Ohioans, she explains her attempts to interview an Ohio State graduate who operated a web site for the Council of Conservative Citizens and lived not far from Roof in South Carolina.

Kyle Rogers, she said, “is on the Southern Poverty Law Center’s Top 30 watch list of ‘new activists heading up the radical right’, and a “prolific white-supremacist writer on black-on-white crime.”

I’ve heard arguments against journalistic transparency, that people don’t care, or that we sound as if we’re whining.  However, Ghansah weaves her experiences in a way that bring the reader into the story. After describing Rogers’ businesses, she offered this powerful exchange that shows clearly the dangers reporters face in doing their work. Rogers’ home, she said, had several chipped-clay statues of black boys.

I know this because after Kyle Rogers refused to take my call, I went there one day and knocked on his door. His neighbor, a heavyset white guy with a buzz cut, had just pulled up in his pickup truck. After he got out, he lingered in his driveway and, with lots of theater, grimaced at me. To make conversation, I asked him if I was at the correct house—I was looking for someone with the last name of Rogers. The neighbor was wearing a sleeveless T-shirt. His arms were sunburnt even though it was December. I think that he was drinking a beer, but he might have just looked like someone who should have been drinking a beer.

He bucked his head toward the house and smirked.

“Him? I don’t know his last name.”

“Okay, well do you know if someone named Kyle lives here?”

That was when he stopped smirking, and I started to suspect I was being had and that we both understood what the deal was. It began to dawn on me that chances were he knew Rogers, he probably liked Rogers, and he probably did not want anyone, especially someone who looked like me, to bother his neighbor.

“My guess is if he was in there, he’d answer,” he said, so I walked back to the door, aware that my back was turned, and knocked again.

A quick flutter of the blinds led me to believe that Kyle Rogers was in there, but that he would not come to the door, so I left him a note with my name and number. On my way back to my car, I looked back to see if he had answered, but there was no sign of him, and no sign that he even lived there except for the decal on his golden brown truck, an image of Trump, raising a beer, enthusiastically mouthing these words: “We did it.”

More importantly, though, this narrative explores reasons for Roof’s actions and arrives at another Ohio-related topic: Hillbilly Elegy. Racial hatred has always been there, she says, but it has been empowered by an economy that robbed young white men of something their parents had: Jobs, income, homes and hope.

This, Ghansah said, is what Roof wrote in jail:

“How can people blame white young people for having no ambition, when they have been given nothing, and have nothing to look forward to? Even your most brain dead white person can see that there is nothing to look forward to? Even your most brain dead white person can see that there is nothing good on the horizon?”

Today, the Akron Beacon Journal has a story that the KKK is actively recruiting in Ohio.

ohio-syringe-exchange

Ohio needle exchanges exist in the major cities, help prevent disease spread

UPDATED

Needle exchanges for drug users often stir opponents who suggest they encourage abuse, but they are critical to the prevention of the spread of HIV and hepatitis, according to the CDC.

The Center for Community Solutions produced a study of syringe exchanges in March 2016 showing that Cleveland was first in 1995, and Portsmouth followed in 2011. Portsmouth and Scioto County have some of the highest death rates from opioid overdoses.

Portsmouth, with a population of 20,000, exchanges 7,000-8,000 syringes a month, according to the report. Cleveland, with nearly 20 times the population, exchanges five times as many syringes. The table is on page 7 of the report.

In Ohio, the programs have expanded rapidly in the past year, with Akron and Toledo adding recently and Cincinnati expanding to Middletown.

Officially, they’re referred to as a Syringe Exchange Program, or SEP.

Tara Britton at the Center for Community Solutions included this in her analysis:

“The fiscal impact of preventing HIV and HCV is considerable given the high costs of treating HIV and HCV. The annual costs of treating HIV in the United States are upwards of $20,000. A medication that can cure HCV costs $1,000 per pill equaling $84,000 over the 12‐week course of treatment.”

This is a changing landscape. Ohio Valley Resource, which is a collaborative of NPR stations from Louisville, Ky., to southeast Ohio, produced this list of exchanges, with hours of operation and phone numbers, but communities are being added rapidly.

OVR has Cincinnati, Cleveland, Dayton, Canton, Portsmouth and Columbus. The site provides web links to each, which is important, because the Cincinnati exchange has expanded into hard-hit Middletown in Butler County.

Since those reports, others have started programs.

Gallia County on the Ohio River in southeast Ohio received permission to open in 2015.

Akron and Summit County launched in the summer of 2016.

According to a Toledo Blade article earlier this year, Lucas County intended to establish a program this year. Is it running?

WKBN in Youngstown reported early this year that in Trumbull County (Warren-Niles) there were “520 newly confirmed and probable hepatitis cases in 2016 alone.” However, there are no programs in Trumbull or Mahoning counties, both of which are among the state’s most severely affected. The closest exchanges for those cities are Pittsburgh and Cleveland.

Are we missing any?

Ohio-drug-prevention-efforts-score

Heroin overdose quick response teams in Ohio and Kentucky

Quick Response Teams

The Cincinnati and Toledo areas were among the first to implement widespread use of Quick Response Teams, generally consisting of two first responders (police and EMT) and at least one social worker.

The purpose is to quickly follow up with overdose victims to check on their health and encourage them to seek help. QRTs that track the victims say that 50-80 percent accept some kind of help. Another finding is that there often is a general plea for other services, such as a ride to a doctor, clothing for children, phone numbers.

Colerain Township, a beltway community of about 56,000 on Cincinnati’s northwest side, became a model for many others around the country, and dispatched people to make presentations on the effectiveness.

The Lucas County sheriff also was an innovator. He was early enough in developing a program that he had to come up with his own name: Drug Abuse Response Team, or DART.

This compilation of QRT information is a work in progress. If you are aware of a community with a QRT and it is not mentioned here, please let me know at doplinger@yourvoiceohio.org

Statewide

Project Dawn Guidelines from ODH: Rapid Increase in Drug Overdoses Community Response Plan Template

Ohio Attorney General guidelines for heroin response

OverdosePreventionStrategies.org Ohio scorecard

Southwest Ohio

Profile of Butler County programs by EMS World 5-6-17, began in 2015
“Out of the 208 people we’ve made contact with 55 percent of those individuals walked through a treatment door.”

Colerain Twp. (Hamilton Co.) was one of the first, a model, WCPO 3-8-17
80% of those contacted follow up with some type of treatment.

Clermont County receives private grant to start up QRT, 1-23-17

Cincinnati mayor, council propose teams 9-2-16 modeled after Colerain

State lawmakers representing Wilmington area put money in a bill for Wilmington QRT 3-20-17

Oxford creates QRT, 10-24-16

Miami County task force Jan. 2017 update

Northwest Ohio

The Lucas County sheriff also was an early leader in quick response, early enough that he created his own name: DART.
Lucas County DART Facebook page

Bowling Green: 8-17-17
Wood County prosecutor proposes that a QRT be formed after losing son

Troy, Ohio: 7-6-16
Troy starts QRT after heroin spike

Northeast Ohio

Coventry Township, Summit County: 5-5-17
Coventry launches heroin-focused QRT

Akron: 3-2-17
Akron launches QRT to combat opiate epidemic

Cuyahoga Falls, Summit County: 1-12-17
Cuyahoga Falls launches QRT

Solutions piece by Cleveland Scene on man in City of Green (Summit County) bringing pieces together for his community

City of Green (Summit County), home of Lt Gov Mary Taylor, starts up QRT, hears presentation from Colerain Twp

Stow and Munroe Falls, Summit County: 4-2-17
Stow and Munroe falls launch QRT

Southeast Ohio

N/A

Central Ohio

Franklin County grant to Columbus: 5-24-17
Program hopes to get overdose patients into treatment

Chillicothe, Ross County among early implementers: 6-25-16 and 9-7-16

Kentucky

Ride-along with WCPO Cincinnati in Kenton County,Florence, Kentucky: 3-9-17

Boone County, Florence, Kentucky: 6-16-17 from the Cincinnati Enquirer
Boone County starts overdose QRT

West Virginia

N/A

Quick-response teams in Ohio visiting OD victims at home

I sat listening Wednesday to Terri Nau and Christa Hyson as they talked calmly about visits with heroin-overdose victims in their homes in Quick-Response Teams.

I was anything but calm.

Hyson recalled visiting an apartment building in Cincinnati, harassed by some men at the doorway as she, first responders and a community worker from Talbert House looked for a woman who recently had overdosed. They found her in the parking lot smoking with a group of people. She was pulled out to be told that were people who want to help her and to provide encouragement.

This is what communities are doing — highly targeted efforts using precision data to engage in some of the most difficult areas of Ohio.

Quick response teams are visiting recent victims, and they’re becoming more common around the state. The Lucas County sheriff has had a similar approach.  The Mahoning County Sheriff will do the same.

Nau is with Talbert House, a non-profit that helps the poor, homeless and those trapped in the heroin net. Hyson is with the Cincinnati Health Department. They’re also using a powerful heroin dashboard created by the city that helps everyone direct resources to neighborhoods and street corners at targeted times of the week

Nau has used the dashboard to direct resources to Lower Price Hill and Mount Washington and to think in new ways to reach people. People who need help the most often are not tuned into conventional information systems such as government and news outlets,.

So what does she do?

I’ll lay that out along with several other solutions in play in other communities as the Ohio Media Project/Your Voice Ohio pursues new approaches to helping turn around the heroin crisis.

A few facts about the gravity: From 2010 through 2015, more than 9,000 people died of opioid overdoses in Ohio. Opioid includes heroin, prescription drugs and fentanyl. In 2016, more than 4,000 more died, and we’re on pace to hit that number this year. That means that in two years, we’ll have as many die of opioid overdoses as we did in the previous six years.

Opioids change the chemistry of the brain, pushing users into a situation that requires intervention. Those dying are overwhelmingly men average and median age of about 40. There are no numbers on how many have been saved.

We’re spending millions of dollars on resuscitation kits.

What can we do to deter that first use, what can we do to remove the triggers for using again, and what can we do to keep people alive until they can be moved into full recovery?

Those are some of the question’s the Your Voice Ohio project will explore.

Meanwhile, Columbia Journalism Review offered four basic facts for journalists that are worthwhile for everyone.